Apple patents new Metallic Material that won’t block wireless signals

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Apple invests heavily into research and development and many of the patents secured by the company don’t even turn into actual products. This time Apple has filed a new patent, which describes creating a new composite metallic material that looks and feels like metal but this material would still allow radio frequencies to pass through.

In its patent application, the Cupertino based giant explained, “Since metal is not radio frequency transparent, metal is generally a poor choice of material when the devices utilize electromagnetic wave transmission, such as radio frequency transmission for communication.”

As per the resources, the portions that cover antennas and touch sensors are made of a non-metallic material such as plastic or glass. Unfortunately, plastic surfaces and glass surfaces have different visual qualities than metallic surfaces, which result in a visible break in the metallic surface.

As suggested by the new patent, Apple seem to be working on the problem, the company is working to develop a metal like material that will allow signals to pass through; Apple is looking to develop a metal that will look and feel like the anodized aluminum but at the same time allow wireless signals to pass through.

Apple previously used the plastic bands to help radio waves get to the iPhone’s antennas. This new material would mean that future iPhones could have an all-metal look and feel without giving up wireless strength. The patent extends beyond iPhones. Apple suggests that this new material could be used for trackpads on new Macbooks.

He have started blogging on Technology and computer at his college time in 2005 and worked with many reputed organization in India. He wrote many guest post for Technology magazine and newspapers worldwide. His writing and passion about Technology make him different from other writers in the global market. He love to write the review and thoughts on any new Technology and invention in current happenings.

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