Scientist suggests that Hurricane Sandy could have been avoided with old tires.

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According to a story published by the Daily Mail , the renowned British scientist Stephen Salter believes that Hurricane Sandy could have been avoided if a pile of old tires had been thrown overboard in time.

According to the publication, Salter invented a huge plastic hoop, dubbed “Salter Sink“, full of old rubber tires, which would be responsible for maintaining the floating structure. The rims could present any diameter – from 10 to 100 meters, for example – and count with a tube inside that would extend for several meters into the seabed, through the wall of water.

Invention simple and inexpensive

The mechanism works quite simply: as waves hit the plastic hoops, warmer surface waters are trapped inside the circle, being pushed toward the bottom of the sea – colder – as successive waves were getting to the rim.

Such a mechanism would be able to dissipate somewhere around 10 billion watts of heat from the surface of the sea, avoiding the storms were formed simply by lack of energy – in the form of heat – enoughThe idea is to position these devices throughout the regions most susceptible to hurricane formation to thereby dissipate heat more shallow waters.


Best of all is that the sinks can be constructed from readily available materials that have been discarded and, in addition to being a simple and inexpensive solution that can potentially prevent many disasters and save thousands of lives. Check out the animation below – in English – the operation of “Salter Sinks”

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